When I first came across the artworks of Moki, it was in her book “How to Disappear” which I couldn’t put down, and took home with me right away, where I spent hours pouring over her beautiful paintings. Now based in Berlin, her detailed paintings are dark, and intriguing.

Her images are unsettling and charming, strange yet familiar. They feature lonely northern landscapes: isolated Scandinavian and Icelandic terrain, a subarctic frozen lake continent, untouched caves and moss meadows, and mountains sculpted into anatomical shapes by wind and water. Animals and humans emerge and dissolve into their environments. Within the solitude of nature, disappearing seems an obvious act. (source)

Visit her website and blog to see more fantastic artworks.

Jeremy Enecio

Sometimes it’s hard to put into words how I feel about someone’s illustration or art. Mostly it’s “I like!” “I like!!” But that’s a pretty boring and shallow way to react to all this visual stimulation. Blame it on watching too much mindless TV. I don’t know. Anyway Jeremy Enecio’s fantastic art makes me gibber “I like” quite a bit. I had to stop for a bit, and actually look harder, take a moment and review why “I like”. I think first he caught my attention with his tribute work entitled Cthulu ( acrylic on paper | 11 x 14 ) The glowing eyes of the beast, and it’s enormity depicted with the tiny shark (that you instinctively know is probably a gazzillion meters long, at least 13 anyway!) drifting through the tentacles, froze me in it’s gaze. I couldn’t look away. Is it not fantastic to have this sort of physical reaction to an artwork. The more I browsed through his portfolio, the more I was entranced. The use of colour and subject matter, especially his fantastical artworks, blew my imagination open wide. Go do yourself a favour and take a peek at his website and blog!

Julian Callos

Now this guy paints some mysterious artworks; mushrooms and flowers infest his characters from a 2011 collection, in an organic explosion of colour and texture. I enjoy his use of colour, and especially his subjects, pale glowing skin, pink fingers, or entirely filled with swirling effects. Julian Callos, is an LA based illustrator, and I recommend you go check out his website. His sculptures are pretty neat too! He is a talented painter, and his editorial work is fantastic. He is able to capture emotions and moments in time with smart attention to detail, creating interesting appealing artworks.

Eric Fortune

Eric Fortune, a painter based in Columbus, Ohio, paints startlingly atmospheric paintings. With Acrylic on water colour paper, he is able to create scenes with an almost unearthly mood. His colour palette enhances his subjects through contrasting use of chiaroscuro. Eric posts plenty of work in progress videos and photos on his blog, which show how he creates his layered work from photo compositions to the finished painting.  Each detail painstakingly thought out and rendered. His work is described as “Lyrical, haunting, yet poignant at the same time,” and indeed, something in the tones, flowing aspects and the characters themselves speak to me of dreams and music.

MFA Illustration April 29 – May 14, 2011

Always lovely to receive a collection of great illustrations from SVA. The exhibition brings together animations, children’s books, graphic novels, figurative paintings, comic books and other narrative works by 21 students graduating from the MFA Illustration as Visual Essay Department at SVA. Curated by faculty member David Sandlin, the exhibition will be on view April 29 – May 14, 2011 at the Visual Arts Gallery, 601 West 26th Street, 15th Floor, New York City.

It’s a very diverse group of illustrators graduating from the MFA Illustrations as a Visual Essay Department at SVA. Some standouts include:
Chi Birmingham’s The Plainview Dispatch: illustrated observations of a fictional town during the height of the Gold Rush.
• The Romance of Tristan & Iseult by Philip Cheaney: interactive animated eBook for the iPad. Video sample here:
Pimlada Phuapradit creates a curious world of defective toys.
• Korean illustrator Jungyeon Roh celebration of the vegan diet.

Here is a collection of what will be at the exibition:


Tactile Illustrator Owen Gildersleeve

I got very excited when I came across Owen’s work. I truly love his handcrafted use of alternative materials in order to create something beautiful and communicative. The details in his cut out crunched up paper leaves and in his hand stitched poster is madness, patient-beautiful madness. Working from London, Owen’s as created illustrations for The TATE, The New York Times, Douglas & GordonMoney Magazine and The Guardian. I love that handmade design/illustration still has a place in this world where artworks are created by means of a mouse click. I hope you enjoy Owen’s work as much as I do.