Eric Fortune

Eric Fortune, a painter based in Columbus, Ohio, paints startlingly atmospheric paintings. With Acrylic on water colour paper, he is able to create scenes with an almost unearthly mood. His colour palette enhances his subjects through contrasting use of chiaroscuro. Eric posts plenty of work in progress videos and photos on his blog, which show how he creates his layered work from photo compositions to the finished painting.  Each detail painstakingly thought out and rendered. His work is described as “Lyrical, haunting, yet poignant at the same time,” and indeed, something in the tones, flowing aspects and the characters themselves speak to me of dreams and music.

Kyung Soon Park

Great new find for me. I love how she has pronounced her lines through a soft colour pallet. The core characters seem to float through and over the context of the artworks making them feel very much alive. All in all her illustrations feel uncluttered, interesting, alive and beautiful.

She has a more organic feel to James Jean probably due to her mediums which are water colour and ink. There is an uncanny similarity between Kyung – Adventure and James Jean – Haze, dont you think? I would also say her subject matter is similar to both James Jean and Yuko Shimizu but a more subtle version of Yuko Shimizu.

Quote from the illustrator: “I try to set the tone of the story being told. Everybody comes with their own unique set of preconceptions that can alter challenge, or reinforce.”  Enjoy!


Kyung Soon Park - Jellyfish
Kyung Soon Park - Jellyfish

 

Phenomenal artwork by Ryohei Hase

The animals being fused with human bodies gives me the feeling that these are expression of perpetual and universal human conditions. Almost all his artwork are incredibly intense and I find myself gripped every time I feast my eyes on his work. Needless to say that the anatomical detail and proportions of his artworks are brilliant.

The Repetition rang (First 2 Illustrations) for me expresses anxiety, struggle, fighting, angst, trapped, rebellion, frustration but all intertwined in on itself – feeding upon itself deepening that experience. A self fulfilling prophecy, one emotion triggering another until absolutely embroiled with no definite starts or ends.  The Room range (Last 3 Illustrations) individually have their meanings. The Rabbit and the Tiger seem very symbolic/mythological but what I would say it  shares with Repetition is the sense of perpetual struggle. A struggle bound to nothing but itself,  nourishes the fight. The other two I will leave open for your own interpretation.

The below two art works are from his Repetition range:

Ryohei-Hase-Rabbit-People

Ryohei-Hase-Dogs-Chains

 

The below 3 art works are from his Room range:

 

Ryohei-Hase-Battle

Ryohei-Hase-Water-Trap

Ryohei-Hase-Blood