Great artwork by Owen Smith

I love the way he exaggerate proportions and emphasise volume and movement. The 1900 to 1950’s figures crowd the frame and overlap each other in angular or swirling composition. He says he is often called on to depict scenes of sexual tension or implied violence. To which he added that it did not matter if the subject is serious or pure kitsch, his work is always about human interaction and isolation. I hope you enjoy his work. :)

Presenting the lovely artwork of Aron Wiesenfeld

Tactile Illustrator Owen Gildersleeve

I got very excited when I came across Owen’s work. I truly love his handcrafted use of alternative materials in order to create something beautiful and communicative. The details in his cut out crunched up paper leaves and in his hand stitched poster is madness, patient-beautiful madness. Working from London, Owen’s as created illustrations for The TATE, The New York Times, Douglas & GordonMoney Magazine and The Guardian. I love that handmade design/illustration still has a place in this world where artworks are created by means of a mouse click. I hope you enjoy Owen’s work as much as I do.

Stacey Rozich and a beautiful Folktale

Born and raised in Seattle/Washington, Stacey tells stories of an early culture, where she explores the relationship between nature and animals. Her brightly coloured and ethnically textured characters give the viewer a sense of nostalgia, seem slightly frightening hidden behind their masks and at the same time appear familiar and inviting. Stacey draws inspiration from cultures all around the world. I love how she portrays her findings in such a fresh and beautiful manner. Have a look at her blog for more folk art.