Mateo Dineen

Originally from California, Mateo moved to Berlin in 2003. His artwork usually incorporates old materials that he finds on the street or at local flea-markets in Germany. Upon these box lids, munitions crates, tobacco tins, and street signs, he creates a world that seems to emerge from another time, or perhaps another dimension. His lovable monsters reflect ourselves back at us. Some display curiosity with a tinge of unease, while others have seemingly been caught unawares whilst having an everyday moment. Just about every image seems to tell a story and invites the viewer to imagine what might occur next.

Video of Mateo painting:

Great artwork by Owen Smith

I love the way he exaggerate proportions and emphasise volume and movement. The 1900 to 1950’s figures crowd the frame and overlap each other in angular or swirling composition. He says he is often called on to depict scenes of sexual tension or implied violence. To which he added that it did not matter if the subject is serious or pure kitsch, his work is always about human interaction and isolation. I hope you enjoy his work. :)

Presenting the lovely artwork of Aron Wiesenfeld

Tactile Illustrator Owen Gildersleeve

I got very excited when I came across Owen’s work. I truly love his handcrafted use of alternative materials in order to create something beautiful and communicative. The details in his cut out crunched up paper leaves and in his hand stitched poster is madness, patient-beautiful madness. Working from London, Owen’s as created illustrations for The TATE, The New York Times, Douglas & GordonMoney Magazine and The Guardian. I love that handmade design/illustration still has a place in this world where artworks are created by means of a mouse click. I hope you enjoy Owen’s work as much as I do.